Mayaglot

Modern Mayan Language Resources

Category: Maya Dictionaries and Grammars

Lacandon Maya-Spanish-English Dictionary

lacandon

From the Publisher:

Around 1700 AD the Lacandon Maya took refuge in the forest lowlands of Chiapas, Mexico, and in western Peten, Guatemala. They were never conquered by the Spanish and thus maintained many of their cultural practices well into the twentieth century. Their language belongs to the Yucatecan branch of the Maya language, a branch that is believed to have begun to diversify at least one thousand years ago. Today the Lacandon are split into northern and southern linguistic groups. This dictionary focuses on the southern Lacandon of Lacanja. Following the same trilingual format as Hofling’s Mopan Maya-Spanish-English Dictionary, this reference contains pronunciation and grammatical information. It is a hybrid of a root dictionary and one with words in alphabetical order; words can be looked up in these two different ways, making it easy to use for both native and nonnative speakers. It accommodates Spanish speakers who wish to learn Lacandon and in the future is likely to be helpful to Lacandon-speaking children, who increasingly use Spanish outside the home, while preserving a record of this indigenous language.

About the Author:

Charles Andrew Hofling is emeritus professor of anthropology at Southern Illinois University, USA. He is the author of Itzaj Maya Grammar (University of Utah Press 2000) and (University of Utah Press 2011).

A Dictionary of Ch’orti’ – now available

chorti

From the Publisher:

Of extant languages, Ch’orti’ Mayan is the closest to ancient the Maya hieroglyphic script, but it is a language that is decreasing in usage. In southern Guatemala where it is spoken, many children no longer learn it, as Spanish dominates most experiences. From linguistic and anthropological data gathered over many years, Kerry Hull has created the largest and most complete Ch’orti’ Mayan dictionary to date. With nearly 9,000 entries, this trilingual dictionary of Ch’orti’, Spanish, and English preserves ancient words and concepts that were vital to this culture in the past.

Each entry contains examples of Ch’orti’ sentences along with their translations. Each term is defined grammatically and linked to a grammatical index. Variations due to age and region are noted. Additionally, extensive cultural and linguistic annotations accompany many entries, providing detailed looks into Ch’orti’ daily life, mythology, flora and fauna, healing, ritual, and food. Hull worked closely with native speakers, including traditional ritual specialists, and presents that work here in a way that is easily accessible to scholars and laypersons alike.

Editorial Reviews

“Professor Hull’s dictionary is the product of one who is not only a competent linguist, but one who is a fluent speaker of the Ch’orti’ language. More importantly, he is meticulously careful with the data.”

—John S. Robertson, Emeritus Professor of Linguistics, Brigham Young University

“Thorough, systematic, well researched, and easy to use. This dictionary will be the standard used by me and anyone else interested in the Ch’orti’ language.”
—Brent Metz, Department of Anthropology, University of Kansas

About the Author

Kerry Hull is currently a professor in the Department of Ancient Scripture at Brigham Young University. He is author of An Abbreviated Dictionary of Ch’orti’ Mayan, and coeditor of ChortiMaya Area: Past and Present and of Parallel Worlds: Genre, Discourse, and Poetics in Contemporary, Colonial, and Classic Maya Literature.

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